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Meeting Announcements


AGU Fall meeting 2003

MARGINS-related sessions

AGU Fall Meeting 2003, San Francisco, California

Dates: December 8-12, 2003
Abstract Deadline: August 28th (paper) and September 4th (electronic), 2003
Pre-registration Deadline: November 5th

Link to conference web site

MARGINS-related Sessions on this page: 
The Contributions of 20 Years of Scientific Ocean Drilling
Beyond Hydrate Ridge: Studies of Natural Gas Hydrate From Around the Globe
Geological and Biogeochemical Processes in a Wet Tropical Setting: New Guinea, Source to Sink
Gas Hydrates in Accretionary Complexes
Identifying Submarine Landslide Time of Failure
Results from MARGINS-funded work in the Gulf of Papua
Results from MARGINS-funded work in the Gulf of Papua (Posters)
Mechanical Strength of the Continental Lithosphere
Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc Processes and Progress
Structure and Evolution of Nonvolcanic Rifted Margins
At the Seismogenic Front: Dynamic Processes at Convergent Margins
The Structure and Physical Properties of Grain Boundaries in Rocks
Structure and Tectonics of the Western U.S. and the Gulf of California I Posters
Light Element Geochemistry: Insights Into High-Temperature Processes
The First Historical Eruption of Anatahan Volcano, Mariana Islands
Oceanographic Research and Marine Mammals

Please send suggestions for additional sessions or other events to be included on this page to the MARGINS Office.


U02: The Contributions of 20 Years of
Scientific Ocean Drilling

Conveners:
Keir Becker, University of Miami - RSMAS, USA
Nicklas Pisias, COAS, Oregon State University, USA

Description:
The year 2003 marks 20 years of scientific ocean drilling through the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), which has been widely hailed as perhaps the most successful example of international cooperation in all of geosciences and has resulted in important scientific advances in nearly all subfields of marine geology and geophysics. This year also heralds the formal beginning of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), an even more ambitious international program that will utilize a range of drilling platforms for scientific ocean drilling throughout the world's ocean basins. This session will celebrate the scientific contributions of scientific ocean drilling through the full range of geoscience themes. We particularly solicit abstracts that (1) synthesize interdisciplinary, thematic, or regional results over multiple expeditions, or (2) present historical perspectives on contributions of scientific ocean drilling from DSDP through ODP with an eye to the future contributions of IODP. We also encourage submission of abstracts that relate to the major findings of scientific ocean drilling, including (but not limited to) the evidence for climate change, both abrupt and long-term; the record of sea-level change; microbial presence and processes in the ocean sediments and crust; the nature of oceanic crust; subduction processes; and fluid flow in oceanic crust and sediments and in subduction settings.  
 

Session U02 web page

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OS07: Beyond Hydrate Ridge: Studies of Natural Gas Hydrate From Around the Globe

Conveners:
Ginger Barth, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, USA
David Scholl, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, USA

Description:
Methane and related natural gases have been identified in marine, inland sea, and permafrost settings around the globe, both as free gas and within natural gas hydrates. From continental margin settings to the deepest ocean basins, methane is evidenced by the presence of bottom simulating seismic reflectors, velocity anomalies, thermal anomalies, geochemical signatures, and thriving biological communities. This methane system is of direct societal significance, as it plays a role in global climate change and geologic hazards and also represents a potential energy resource. This broadly inclusive AGU session solicits contributions that address the generation, detection, characterization, quantification, and/or implications of natural gas hydrate deposits. Studies of methane hydrate in deep water settings are particularly encouraged. Modeling and laboratory studies aimed at the quantitative interpretation of field observations are also particularly welcomed. The aim of this session is to bring together the many disciplines involved in hydrate studies, thereby providing a meeting focus for the natural gas and gas hydrates research community. This session will be coordinated with the more site-focused one on Gas Hydrates in Accretionary Complexes (convener: A. Trehu). Conveners will be happy to guide relevant contributions to their most appropriate session.  
 

Session OS07 web page

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OS08: Geological and Biogeochemical Processes in a Wet Tropical Setting: New Guinea, Source to Sink

Conveners:
Robert Aller, Stony Brook University, USA
Charles Nittrouer, University of Washington, USA

Description:
The dominant transfer of particulate and dissolved components on the Earth's surface occurs in wet tropical settings. Among these settings, the islands of the Indo-Pacific Archipelago are very important. Intense research has started in association with the largest island, New Guinea. This session represents an opportunity for international scientists working in both the source areas on land and the sink areas of the ocean to present and integrate their research. This will include studies of hydrology, geomorphology, sedimentology, stratigraphy, and organic/inorganic geochemistry that define the processes extending from fluvial environments to the continental margin.  
 

Session OS08 web page

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OS09: Gas Hydrates in Accretionary Complexes

Conveners:
Anne Trehu, Oregon State University, USA
Joel Johnson, Oregon State University, USA

Description:
The year 2002 was marked by several cruises focused on studying gas hyrates in accretionary complexes, including ODP Leg 204 to Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon. In this session we seek to bring together researchers from a broad range of disciplines to further our understanding of the processes that control formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in this environment. We encourage presentations of new data and of modeling efforts that incorporate constraints from the new data. This session will be coordinated with a related session on the global occurrence of gas hydrates to provide a forum for furthering research on naturally occurring gas hydrates.

Session OS09 web page

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OS11: Identifying Submarine Landslide Time of Failure

Conveners:
David Tappin, British Geological Survey, UK
Philip Watts, Applied Fluids Engineering, Inc., USA

Description:
Submarine landslides are now recognized as significant mass movement and tsunami hazards. While marine geology techniques for identifying submarine landslides are well established, there remains considerable uncertainty with regard to the time of failure. Given the general absence of submarine landslide detection instruments, the only way to assess the involvement of a submarine landslide in a given natural disaster is to identify the time of failure with reasonable accuracy. We consider a wide range of interdisciplinary techniques that can assist in determining the time of failure. These methods/approaches include: morphological or depositional, biological, geothermal, radioisotope, geotechnical, fluid expulsion, seismic and acoustic, and water wave observation. We attempt to demonstrate the specific roles for different types of sampling, instrumentation, and observation.

Session OS11 web page

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OS11A: Geological and Biogeochemical Processes in a Wet Tropical Setting: New Guinea, Source to Sink

0800 Monday, 8 Dec
Room MCC 3000

Holocene Evolution of the Middle Fly River, Papua New Guinea
J Chappell, W E Dietrich

Morphodynamic Modeling of the Co-evolution of Channel and Floodplain in Large, Sand-bed Rivers
J Lauer, G Parker

Evidence for Low Sea Level Incision of the Gulf Of Papua Shelf by the Fly River and by Tidal Currents During the Quaternary
P T Harris, A Heap, V Passlow, M Hughes, J Daniell, O Anderson

Submarine Rivers of Mud and Sand: Channels Dispersing Sediment Across the Fly River Clinoform
C A Nittrouer, J S Crockett, A S Ogston, R W Sternberg, B T Donahue, D F Naar, M A Goni, J Walsh, N Driscoll

Sediment Transport Under Monsoon Conditions on the Fly River Clinoform, Papua New Guinea
A S Ogston, J S Crockett, R W Sternberg, C A Nittrouer

Relationships Between Early Diagenetic Processes, Carbon Remineralization, and Sedimentary Dynamics in the Gulf of Papua Deltaic Complex
R C Aller, N E Blair, C Panzeca, A Hannides, C Heilbrun

Geochemical Budget for Barium on the Wet Tropical Continental Shelf \& Slope of the Gulf of Papua, Papua New Guinea.
G J Brunskill, I Zagorskis, J Pfitzner, H Wu, G Shen, R Hamme

Benthic Communities as Indicators of Geological and Biogeochemical Processes in the Gulf of Papua
J Y Aller, S Dhir, J Chummar, M M Dantzler, R C Aller

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OS12A: (Poster Session) Geological and Biogeochemical Processes in a Wet Tropical Setting: New Guinea, Source to Sink

1330 Monday, 8 Dec
MCC Level 1, Posters 183-193

Platinum Group Element Fractionations in Sediments in the Gulf of Papua, New Guinea
C E Martin, B Peucker-Ehrenbrink, G Ravizza, G Brunskill

Biogeochemical and Sedimentary Processes in the Wet Tropics
M A Goni, N Monacci, R Gisewhite

Carbon Cycling And Diagenetic Carbonate Formation in the Gulf of Papua, Papua New Guinea
T Fang, R Aller, N Blair

Preliminary Characterization of Organic Geochemistry in the Fly-Strickland River System, Papua New Guinea
S R Alin, R Aalto, S M Remington, J E Richey

Sediment Deposition and Accumulation in a Seasonal Repository of the Fly River Shelf Clinoform, Papua New Guinea
J S Crockett, C A Nittrouer, A S Ogston, D F Naar

Controls on Subaqueous-Delta Clinoform Development
J Walsh, N W Driscoll, C A Nittrouer

Characterization and Timing of Siliciclastic Sediment Fluxes to Continental Slopes of the Coral Sea During the Late Quaternary
J M Francis, G R Dickens, M C Page

A Tropical View of Quaternary Sequence Stratigraphy and a Dynamic View of the Sink Along the Northeast Australian Margin: The Accumulation of Riverine Material on Slopes Since the Last Glacial Maximum
M C Page, G R Dickens, G B Dunbar

Response of the Ganges dispersal system to climate change: a source-to-sink view since the last interstade
S L Goodbred Jr.

The Role of Conjoining (Tie) Channels in Lowland Floodplain Development and Lake Infilling
J C Rowland, W E Dietrich, G Day, K Lepper, C J Wilson

Mapping the Extent and Rate of Overbank Deposition Using Mine-Derived Sediment Tracers Along the Strickland River, Papua New Guinea
S C Apte, W E Dietrich, G M Day, C Reibe, R Aalto, J Sanders, W Lauer, S L Simpson, A Marshall, M Bera

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S15: Mechanical Strength of the Continental Lithosphere

Conveners:
Wang-Ping Chen, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA
Brian Evans, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

Description:
How mechanical strength of the continental lithosphere varies with depth is an issue central to a wide range of interdisciplinary topics. For instance, the concept that a weak, ductile lower crust overlies a strong lithospheric mantle has led to diverse ideas such as linking climate changes to posttectonic magmatism, hydration of the mantle during continental breakup, and mechanisms for wholesale uplift of plateaus. Consequently, there are renewed interests in examining the basic tenets of continental rheology, and this session will provide a forum of wide perspective, bringing together latest findings such as intracontinental earthquakes, rheological effects of volatiles and partial melts, and geodynamic modeling of relevant data sets. We welcome abstracts that constrain the mechanical strength of the deep lithosphere under continental landmasses using in situ geophysical observations (such as surface deformation, lithospheric bending, earthquakes and seismic imaging, gravity, and heat flow), experimental rock mechanics, and petrographic and structural studies of naturally deformed rocks. We are particularly interested in comparing results, implications, and inferences drawn from different methods to identify key issues. Our goal is to promote interdisciplinary integration of results that will lead to the next generation of rheological models for the continental lithosphere.

Session S15 web page

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T05: Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc Processes and Progress

Conveners:
Jim Gill , UCSC, USA
Simon Klemperer, Stanford, USA
Yoshi Tamura, IFREE/JAMSTEC, Japan

Description:
Much work has been conducted since the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) Workshop in Hawaii, 2002 (see Eos volo 84, p. 3). This session is an opportunity to share recent results and for newcomers to learn about this study site of the NSF MARGINS and Japanese Subduction Factory programs. Contributions are encouraged from anyone currently working on the geology, geophysics, or geochemistry of the subducting plate, forearc, volcanic arc, or backarc of the entire IBM system, the history of the Philippine Sea Plate as it affects IBM, or other forcing functions applicable to the arc.

Session T05 web page

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T06: Structure and Evolution of Nonvolcanic Rifted Margins

Conveners:
Brian Tucholke, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, USA
Jean-Claude Sibuet, Ifremer Centre de Brest, France
Dale Sawyer, Rice University, USA

Description:
Continental rifting leading to seafloor spreading is a fundamental component of the plate-tectonic cycle that still is poorly understood. The processes that attend continental separation (crustal thinning, volcanism, faulting, uplift, and eventual thermal subsidence) profoundly modify continental edges and leave behind important geological records of their operation. To understand these processes, we need detailed information on lithospheric structure and the stratigraphic record, both from continental edges in submarine settings and from fossil margins now exposed on land. In addition, data from conjugate margins are important for determining the degree to which rifting processes and development of the sedimentary record are symmetrical on opposing margins. This session focuses on nonvolcanic rifted margins. Data acquired in recent years show these margins to be structurally complex, manifesting such varied features as differential thinning of continental crustal layers, multiple generations of normal faulting, development of metamorphic core complexes, extensive exhumation and serpentinization of mantle, association with early ultraslow seafloor spreading, and contrasting thermal and subsidence histories between margin conjugates. This session is intended to foster new insights into the evolution of nonvolcanic margins from recently acquired geological, geophysical, and drilling data, as well as from synthesis of existing data. We particularly encourage abstracts that compare and contrast conjugate margins and that provide new perspectives from subaerial as well as submarine environments.

Session T06 web page

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T11: At the Seismogenic Front: Dynamic Processes at Convergent Margins

Conveners:
Harold Tobin, New Mexico Tech, USA
Kohtaro Ujiie, IFREE/JAMSTEC, Japan
Susan Bilek, New Mexico Tech, USA
Demian Saffer , University of Wyoming, USA

Description:
Current multidisciplinary research is rapidly changing our view of the shallow subduction zone processes governing strain accumulation and release, fault mechanics, fault hydrogeology, tsunamigenesis, and earthquake dynamics. This session will provide a forum for new results in geophysical imaging, experimental fault mechanics, seismic source processes, geodetics, structural geology, in situ studies, and other topics related to the shallow subduction zone environment. We welcome submissions on any topic related to forearc dynamics and the seismogenic zone at any convergent margin, especially those highlighting the Nankai Trough of southwestern Japan and the Middle America Trench, the two focus sites of the MARGINS SEIZE program.

Session T11 web page

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T17: The Structure and Physical Properties of Grain Boundaries in Rocks

Conveners:
Georg Dresen, GeoForschungsZentrum, Germany
David Kohlstedt, University of Minnesota, USA
Wirth Richard, GeoForschungsZentrum, Germany

Description:
Grain boundaries and phase boundaries are important structural defects in rocks. In polycrystalline, multiphase materials, grain interfaces are present in many different configurations forming extended three-dimensional networks very much like the networks of liquid films that constitute foams. Even though grain boundary structures are measured on the nanometer scale, large-scale properties of rocks such as elasticity, strength, electrical conductivity, and diffusive mass transport depend on the physical and chemical properties of grain boundaries. Consequently, geodynamic processes involving rock deformation, fluid transport, metamorphic reactions, melting, and melt segregation all depend critically on the properties of grain boundaries. Our conceptual view of the grain boundary structure stems largely from observations on metals and ceramics. However, since the mineralogical properties and chemical composition of rocks are significantly more complex, we simply do not know to what extent existing grain boundary models are representative for rocks. We need to understand the structure and transport properties of grain and phase boundaries present in Earth materials on the atomic scale. Recent implementation of new analytical techniques and significant advances in high-resolution microstructure analysis are about to fundamentally change our view of structure and physical properties of grain boundaries. With enhanced computational power and new software development, sophisticated atomic-scale models can now be tested against experimental observations. The session will cover four thematic topics from experimental, analytical, and modeling perspectives of grain boundaries: (1) high-resolution microstructure investigation of natural and synthetic grain and phase boundaries; (2) modeling of grain boundary structures and processes; (3) physical properties of grain boundaries such as conductivity and diffusivity; (4) strain localization in crust and mantle; and (5) interface diffusion controlled creep of crustal and mantle rocks.

Session T17 web page

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T31: Structure and Tectonics of the Western U.S. and the Gulf of California I Posters

Abstracts:
H. Brown et al, Seismic Imaging of the continent-ocean transition in the southern Gulf of California

W.R. Drake et al, San José Island Accommodation Zone, Baja California Sur, Mexico: A Key to Onshore-Offshore Fault Relationships along the Western Margin of the Southern Gulf of California

J. Fletcher et al, Palinspastic Reconstructions of the Gulf of California Based on Airy Isostatic Profiles: Evidence for One Kinematic Phase of Neogene Shearing

R. Givler et al, Timing, Style, and Magnitude of Upper Crustal Extension, Sierra San Felipe, NE Baja California, Mexico: Constraints on Rift Processes in the NW Gulf of California Extensional Province

A. González-Fernández et al, Seismic images of faulting and fossil subduction of the southern Baja California margins

Lizarralde et al, Crustal structure and rift evolution across the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California

F. Sutherland, et al, Continent-Ocean Transition Across the Alarcon Basin, Gulf of California from Seismic Reflection and Refraction Data

Umhoefer et al, A possible widespread Upper Miocene to Lower Pliocene rift-related sequence under the marine shelf from Mazatlan to the Tres Marias islands, southeastern Gulf of California, Gulf of California MARGINS project

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V08: Light Element Geochemistry: Insights Into High-Temperature Processes

Conveners:
Bill McDonough, University of Maryland, USA
Craig Lundstrom, Univ. of Illinois-Urbana Champaign, USA
Adam Kent, Oregon State University, USA

Description:
New insights into high-temperature processes are being realized because of recent analytical advances in the analyses of trace light elements and their isotopes. Several nontraditional light isotope systems are beginning to mature (e.g., Li, B, Mg, Cl), providing novel data and information about processes as diverse as magmatism, high-T metamorphism, and crust-mantle recycling. In addition, new data for light element partitioning and diffusion provide experimental constraints on the mechanisms and rates of processes affecting the geochemistry of these elements. This symposium will bring together scientists from diverse backgrounds who are examining high-temperature processes using constraints provided by light element studies. We welcome a range of experimental, petrological, chemical, and isotopic investigations of these elements related to high-temperature Earth processes. We also welcome contributions detailing technical advances in isotopic and abundance measurement of light elements in geological materials.

Session V08 web page  

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V15: The First Historical Eruption of Anatahan Volcano, Mariana Islands

Conveners:
Doug Wiens, Washington University, St. Louis, USA
Tobias Fischer, University of New Mexico, USA
David Hilton, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USA
Juan Camacho, Emergency Management Office, Saipan, UMI

Description:
The first historical eruption of Anatahan volcano in the Mariana Islands began on 10 May 2003. The eruption has been well documented by satellite observations, several sampling trips, and seismological instrumentation fortuitously installed 4 days prior to the eruption. We encourage the submission of abstracts that discuss the geophysical and volcanological observations of the eruption as well as the geochemistry and petrology of the recently erupted materials. In addition, we welcome abstracts that discuss the implications of these observations for our understanding of geochemical and geodynamical processes associated with Mariana arc volcanism.

Session V15 web page

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PA01: Oceanographic Research and Marine Mammals

Conveners:
John Orcutt, Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, La Jolla, USA
G. Michael Purdy, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, USA
Darlene Ketten, Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., USA

Description:
The first historical eruption of Anatahan volcano in the Mariana Islands began on 10 May 2003. The eruption has been well documented by satellite observations, several sampling trips, and seismological instrumentation fortuitously installed 4 days prior to the eruption. We encourage the submission of abstracts that discuss the geophysical and volcanological observations of the eruption as well as the geochemistry and petrology of the recently erupted materials. In addition, we welcome abstracts that discuss the implications of these observations for our understanding of geochemical and geodynamical processes associated with Mariana arc volcanism.

Session PA01 web page

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Last updated Tuesday, November 11, 2003